July 11, 2010

Today was another class day. Bro Manscill likes to quiz on pretty minute details… kinda frustrating… and sometimes the details he chooses to go over are a little too tangential for me, but some things are really interesting. We talked about resurrection today. He recommended a talk by Robert J. Matthews on resurrection. I am totally going to look it up. The resurrection is something that I’ve always thought is a little confusing—who is resurrected when, when does it start, what happens with the Second Coming and the Millennium, etc. If anyone else has a good talk that sets it out in a deep, yet understandable way, I’d love it! At 1, we had the best lunch (they had these fried rice cakes—worlds better than keesh!), and right after (they said 2pm) we were going to go to Hippo. I went back to my apartment to start my homework for our evening class, and I get a knock on my door at 1:40 saying they were leaving right then! Because I knew our teacher was driving us personally, I didn’t even grab anything—I just left (in my light, athletic clothing—basically my pajamas!). But I am SO glad they came and got me. It was a waaaaaaaaay cool spot! It is an active archaeological dig with an original Roman road, a temple, a bath house, and other buildings with huge Roman columns in amazing condition. But the best part was definitely the cave we found. It was alongside the Roman road, and it had huge beetles, scorpions, and bats. Dozens of bats! No one brought a light with them, so I went first with my phone’s LED light (until the very end, when I started the video). It was so cool! We had bats fly into us (riiiight over our heads) several times. My friend Chris actually got hit once, but he had a hat, so he was ok. We got back to the Kibbutz at about 3:15, so I was able to do my reading in time for dinner and class.

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The entrance to the bat cave
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You can’t see super well, but this is a picture of a scorpion and a bat!
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This is an active dig, so we took the opportunity to pose with some of their tools by one of the pillars. Our teacher said that this particular dig wasn’t being managed very professionally, however…
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Part of the better dug area of one of the temples on site.
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An original Roman road in excellent condition!

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